Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

The Future is Freelance

More people, especially those of us who have recently been laid off, may have freelance contracting for knowledge work in our future, according to Sarah E. Needleman’s article Negotiating the Freelance Economy, in today’s Wall Street Journal. It points out the sobering fact that not just full time, but temporary work opportunities are also less available than a year ago. Hence the increased popularity of sites such as elance.com, odesk.com, guru.com and sologig.com. Needleman also does a good job of pointing out some of the practicalities and possible pitfalls of working this way. In a similar vein, see the May 4 report by Jessica Dickler in CNNMoney.com, Freelance is the new full-time.…

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Living in More Than One World the Alain de Botton Way

The subject of The Independent’s My secret life feature on May 2 is the London-based author Alain de Botton, whose new book, The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work, has already been published in the UK, and comes out in the USA next month. Rather than a standard Q&A format, My secret life draws out brief answers to such statements as:  “At night I dream of”… “When I was a child I wanted to be”… “My greatest inspirations are”…(One of the replies to the latter is Geoff Dyer, who was featured in this blog on May 2.) A look at de Botton’s site shows him to be an embodiment of living in more than one world.…

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The Ongoing Wisdom of Huston Smith

Lisa Miller of Newsweek has a revealing interview/feature on Huston Smith. The 90 year old religion author-professor has an important new book:  Tales of Wonder: Adventures Chasing the Divine, an Autobiography. The foreword was written by Pico Iyer, whom I referenced in the May 2 blog on Geoff Dyer. (Iyer’s book The Open Road: The Global Journey of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, recently came out in paperback.) Smith is known for his million-selling book The World’s Religions, originally published in 1958 as The Religions of Man.  It was also completely revised and updated when it was renamed in 1991.…

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Geoff Dyer: Traveling Far and Wide

The Australian has an insightful interview/feature story on the British author Geoff Dyer, whose writing has encompassed many worlds, with books in both fiction and nonfiction. I’ve only read one, the wonderfully-titled collection of essays Yoga For People Who Can’t Be Bothered To Do It. His new novel, Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi, was reviewed in The New York Times by another highly accomplished, well-traveled writer, Pico Iyer. Also see the brief Q&A in The New York Times’ Paper Cuts blog, Stray Questions for Geoff Dyer. I really like this quote from The Australian interview: “All the writing I do is for me and about things I want to learn about, (which) are adding to my cultural capital.” Finally, Dyer reveals his fantasy career in a short piece for The Observer, My other life: Geoff Dyer.…

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If you’re curious, read (and listen) on…

The pros and cons of curiosity in life are explored in a great radio interview yesterday with psychology professor Todd Kashdan, of George Mason University, on The Kojo Nnamdi Show, produced by WAMU-FM. (It’s the public broadcasting station of my undergrad alma mater, The American University, in Washington, D.C., and also the producer of The Diane Rehm Show.) Kashdan was promoting his new book Curious? Discover the Missing Ingredient to a Fulfilling Life. For more on Kashdan and the book, see his Q&A with Positive Psychology News Daily, and his blog. He’s also one of the interviewees in Deborah Kotz’s recent usnews.com post, 10 Secrets to Finding Happiness During the Recession.…

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