Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

6 Success Strategies of Jorge Luis Borges

Jorge Luis Borges was born 118 years ago today, on August 24, 1899. The Borges Boom shows no signs of decline: his literary influence remains strong, he is quoted and referenced in a variety of contexts, and books by and about him continue to be published. Last year marked the 30th anniversary of the Argentine author’s death. On December 7, 2016, the Library of Congress presented a fascinating conversation, now available on video, with Borges’ widow María Kodama and University of Maryland professor and longtime Borges scholar Saúl Sosnowski. (I wrote about my connection to Saúl, author of Borges y La Cábala: En búsqueda del verbo, in the 2010 post 111 Years of Jorge Luis Borges.)

In the spirit of my 2013 post 7 Self-Management Secrets of Jorge Luis Borges, consider these strategies, which I contend were crucial to Borges’ success (during his life and beyond); even if he may not have considered them to be strategies!

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Opportunities for the Future at the 20th Special Libraries Symposium

Despite all the changes and challenges facing librarians and information professionals, there are many opportunities to make a difference within organizations and society at large. That was one of the major takeaways from the 20th Special Libraries Symposium, held on July 27th, at The Catholic University of America Department of Library and Information Science. I produce the Symposium each semester I teach as an adjunct professor at the school, for the students in my class, LSC 888, The Special Library/Information Center, and invited guests.

{All photos courtesy of SLA}

The most recent year I wrote about the symposium was in 2012.

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Special Libraries Summer Class Debriefing

Last week, my summer teaching semester ended for LSC 888, the Special Library/Information Center, at the Catholic University of America Department of Library and Information Science. It was an intensive experience: two classes a week for six weeks (other than July 4th); each for three hours and ten minutes. Although there were only four students, it was a lively and engaged group. Each student brought a varied set of work and educational experience to the class, and they developed a strong rapport with the guest lecturers who joined us throughout the semester: James King, National Institutes of Health Library; Marie Kaddell of LexisNexis; Kimberly Ferguson, Library of Congress; Amanda J.

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Changing the World the Jane Jacobs Way

If you’d like to make your mark on the world during your lifetime, with the hope that your influence extends beyond your death, a perfect role model is Jane Jacobs. Perhaps best known for her classic 1961 book The Death and Life of Great American Cities, she was a major urban activist over a long period of time (she died in 2006, at 89). Her influence reached beyond urban affairs to economics and more, and continues to grow. Last week, in my post about Tom Butler-Bowdon’s new book 50 Economics Classics, I noted that Jacobs was included, even though she was not an economist, for her book The Economy of Cities.

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