Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

17 Books of the Year Lists for 2017

If it’s really the most wonderful time of the year, one reason must be the publication of so many books of the year lists. As in past years, I have collected and curated some of the most informative lists for my year-end post. The amount and quality of these books is breathtaking. And it’s safe to say that many other noteworthy books did not make these lists, but are still worthy of attention. Here are 17 of the top lists, business-focused and otherwise, for 2017:

Photo credit: Bigstock

Bloomberg: the Best Books of 2017

CNBC: 13 of the best business books of 2017

The Economist: Books of the Year 2017

Financial Times: FT Series: Books of the Year 2017

Financial Times: FT & McKinsey Business Book of the Year 2017

(The winner is Amy Goldstein’s Janesville: An American Story.)

Forbes: Top 10 Business Books for 2017, by Shep Hyken

Fortune: Fortune’s Favorite Business Books of the Year

The Globe and Mail: The Globe 100

Inc.com: 12 of the Best Business Books of 2017, According to the Stanford Business School

The Irish Times: The best business books of 2017 and the ones to avoid

Library Journal: Best Books 2017

Los Angeles Times: Best Books of 2017/Best Non-Fiction

The New York Times: The 10 Best Books of 2017

Publishers Weekly: Best Books 2017

Strategy + Business: Best Business Books 2017

USA TODAY: 10 books we loved reading in 2017

The Washington Post: Best Books 2017

The Bloomberg list  is particularly intriguing, as it’s a survey of recommendations from major names in the business world, including Glenn Hubbard, Dean of the Columbia Business School (the above-mentioned Janesville: An American Story, by Amy Goldstein); Marc Andreessen, software pioneer/venture capitalist (Extreme Ownership: How U.S.

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The “Deeper Sense of Purpose” of T. George Harris, a Collaborator and Friend of Peter Drucker

T. George Harris, who died at 89 in 2013, eight years after his longtime friend and collaborator, Peter Drucker, led a colorful, creative and productive life. Harris wrote and edited about many subjects, including civil rights, politics, business, psychology, careers, self-development, health and spirituality.

Photo credit: The Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University

He was born in Kentucky, served in World War II and graduated from Yale. He became a journalist, as a reporter and later bureau chief and editor for Time and Look magazines. Harris was a media pioneer when it came to mind-body health, for instance as founding editor of American Health magazine, and particularly about how health intersected with spirituality.

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7 Lessons from Drucker Day 2017

I recently returned from this year’s Drucker Day (November 4) at the Drucker School of Management in Claremont, California, part of the Claremont Graduate University. The event attracted more than 400 alumni, students, faculty, staff, and friends of the school. The theme was “The Peter Drucker Path: Past, Present and Future.”

Photos Courtesy of Claremont Graduate University.

I’ve attended (and sometimes participated in) a number of these events, and have written about them, most recently at Drucker Day 2015. The morning keynote this year was by Renée Mauborgne, a professor at the business school INSEAD, and co-author (with W.

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Max De Pree, Peter Drucker and the Art of Leadership

I was saddened recently to learn of the August 8th death, at 92, of Max De Pree, who had an illustrious career as CEO and Chairman of the innovative furniture/design company Herman Miller.

In 1989, after he retired as CEO but while remaining as Chairman, he also started a parallel career as a best-selling leadership author; particularly with his first book, Leadership is an Art; the follow-up Leadership Jazz, and in 1997, with Leading Without Power: Finding Hope in Serving Community. These slim volumes are eloquent, full of wisdom of various types, and spiritually reflective of De Pree’s deep Christian faith.

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150 Years On: Karl Marx, Das Kapital/Capital, and the British Library

September 14 marked the 150th anniversary of the original, German-language publication of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital, later published in English-language editions (in multiple volumes) as Capital. What I find particularly interesting is that it was largely written in the reading room of the British Library (at the time located at the British Museum). Marx’s long history of using the library for reading, research and writing is detailed in the recent British Library European studies blog post by Izzy Gibbin, “150 Years of Capital.

In Germany, the land of Marx’s birth, the international broadcaster Deutsche Welle (DW) recently published “Karl Marx’s ‘Das Kapital’ still fascinates after 150 years,” a Q&A with author/journalist Bernd Ziesemer.

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Inventing the Future with Pagan Kennedy

Most people take for granted the wonders surrounding us, including the accumulated inventions of many centuries that make our lives safer, easier, more productive and more satisfying. We rarely stop to think of who invented things that are indispensable to daily life. If you want to open your eyes to a richer appreciation of the world of invention and inventors, and the psychology and thought processes that underpin this discipline, turn to Pagan Kennedy and her 2016 book Inventology: How We Dream Up Things That Change the World.

Kennedy has written a number of books and countless freelance articles in a variety of publications.

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35 Years On: Revisiting Peter Drucker’s The Changing World of the Executive

Soaring executive pay. The future of health care. Disappearing manufacturing jobs. Information overload. These are all hot button topics today. They were also subjects written about by Peter Drucker during the mid-1970s to early 1980s, as shown in his 1982 book The Changing World of the Executive. While Drucker contributed to many publications on a regular basis, and published a number of collections of his writings, as I wrote about last year in my post “Peter Drucker: Freelance Writer,” this anthology came primarily from his columns written for the Wall Street Journal between 1975 and 1981.

Although the original book had gone out of print, The Changing World of the Executive was reissued in 2010 by Harvard Business Review Press, as part of its series “The Drucker Library.”  Drucker divides the book into five sections: Executive Agenda, Business Performance, The Non-Profit Sector, People at Work, and the Changing Globe.

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6 Success Strategies of Jorge Luis Borges

Jorge Luis Borges was born 118 years ago today, on August 24, 1899. The Borges Boom shows no signs of decline: his literary influence remains strong, he is quoted and referenced in a variety of contexts, and books by and about him continue to be published. Last year marked the 30th anniversary of the Argentine author’s death. On December 7, 2016, the Library of Congress presented a fascinating conversation, now available on video, with Borges’ widow María Kodama and University of Maryland professor and longtime Borges scholar Saúl Sosnowski. (I wrote about my connection to Saúl, author of Borges y La Cábala: En búsqueda del verbo, in the 2010 post 111 Years of Jorge Luis Borges.)

In the spirit of my 2013 post 7 Self-Management Secrets of Jorge Luis Borges, consider these strategies, which I contend were crucial to Borges’ success (during his life and beyond); even if he may not have considered them to be strategies!

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Changing the World the Jane Jacobs Way

If you’d like to make your mark on the world during your lifetime, with the hope that your influence extends beyond your death, a perfect role model is Jane Jacobs. Perhaps best known for her classic 1961 book The Death and Life of Great American Cities, she was a major urban activist over a long period of time (she died in 2006, at 89). Her influence reached beyond urban affairs to economics and more, and continues to grow. Last week, in my post about Tom Butler-Bowdon’s new book 50 Economics Classics, I noted that Jacobs was included, even though she was not an economist, for her book The Economy of Cities.

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50 Economics Classics: Tom Butler-Bowdon

Tom Butler-Bowdon has recently added another title, 50 Economics Classics, to his long-running and super-effective 50 Classics series.

Part of the genius of this book is broadening the content beyond the people we normally associate with Economics as a discipline and field of study (Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Joseph Schumpeter and so on), to those from other disciplines who have had impact on the field, such as Michael Lewis, Eric Brynjolfsson & Andrew McAfee, Jane Jacobs and John C. Bogle. The centrality of people, as well as institutions and disciplines, shines throughout, especially in the entries on such titles as Gary Becker’s Human Capital and Elinor Ostrom’s Governing the Commons.

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