Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

7 Self-Management Secrets of Jorge Luis Borges

The title of a recent Los Angeles Times piece by Hector Tobar says it all: “The Borges boom: he may be dead, but his legacy remains strong.” August 24 was the 114th anniversary of Jorge Luis Borges’ birth in Buenos Aires; he died June 14, 1986, in Geneva. Tobar points out the heavy, multimedia presence for Borges, as well as the ongoing book releases, long after his death.

Chartres-Labyrinth

Chartres-Labyrinth

The latest were published this summer by New Directions: Professor Borges: A Course on English Literature; and Borges at 80: Conversations. They have inspired a variety of additional coverage, such as “Two New Books About ‘Borges’,” by Mark O’Connell in The New Yorker; “Jorge Luis Borges and His Library of Babble,” by Michael Hingston, in the Globe and Mail; and “Borges, Politics, and the Postcolonial,” by Gina Apostol, in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

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The Summer of Happiness

If we had an unlimited amount of time on this earth, it would take a big chunk of that time to read all of the books, articles, websites and blogs devoted to the subject of happiness. But that doesn’t stop the flow, or end the curiosity of those of us who are intensely interested in the subject. The cover of the July 8/15 Summer Double Issue of TIME magazine is “The Pursuit of Happiness.” It is a five part, 15 page section; including the lead article by Jeffrey Kluger, “The Happiness of Pursuit.” (This is also the title of a quirky, engaging book by Cornell University psychology professor Shimon Edelman.)

Summer happiness photo

The special section also includes a happiness poll and a look at happiness around the world (including the transformation of Finland from the suicide capital of the world into a much happier country).…

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10 Great Summer Books Lists for 2013

Now that we are a day away from the 4th of July, it’s time for one of my favorite summer activities, rounding up some of the many helpful and downright addictive Summer reading lists published recently. Reading/skimming these lists provides a window into the world of other people and organizations — how they are planning to spend their summer; outlining their desires, hopes and good intentions, looking for the promise that a great book can deliver.

Relaxing by reading on the beach

 

Here are ten of the many lists that aim to guide us to reading bliss for the next couple of months:

Financial Times: Summer books guide
The Guardian: Summer Reading
Los Angeles Times: Summer books
NPR: Summer Books 2013
Oprah/O: O’s 2013 Summer Reading List
Publishers Weekly: Best Summer Books 2013
Slate: Summer Reading 2013
Stanford Graduate School of Business: Top 13 Business Books to Read This Summer
TED blog: Your mega summer reading list: 200 books recommended by TEDsters
USA TODAY: 30 Hot Books for Summer

Along with the Los Angeles Times list, in the article “David L.

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Deborah Kalb: Interview With an Interviewer

Today’s post is an interview with Deborah Kalb, who produces the terrific Book Q&As website, in which she conducts brief but incisive interviews with a wide variety of authors. A short sample of some of the most recent interviewees: novelists Susan Coll and Tracy Chevalier; nonfiction authors A.J. Jacobs and Naomi Schaefer Riley; and poet Peter Fortunato, whom I had not heard of previously and found particularly interesting. (I was really honored to be interviewed last December.) In addition, Deborah is a freelance writer and editor, who spent two decades working as a journalist in Washington, D.C. She is the co-author, with her father, Marvin Kalb, of Haunting Legacy: Vietnam and the American Presidency from Ford to Obama.…

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Books Alive Conference Recap: Part Two

The tone of the June 8 Books Alive! 2013 conference, sponsored by the Washington Independent Review of Books, was optimistic, upbeat and positive. The consensus seemed to be that books have a bright future, regardless of current or as yet unimagined formats.

By the end of the all-day event, which I also wrote about earlier this week, it was reinforced that authors, whether with a traditional publisher or self-published, have many avenues for self-promotion and to increase opportunities to earn money. (Although a recurring theme, besides that of continuing to hone your craft as a writer, was “don’t give up your day job.”)

The State of the Market panel; photo by David Gelin

The State of the Market panel; photo by David Gelin

During a morning panel session, the novelist/freelance journalist Jennifer Miller related her promotion efforts for her novel The Year of the Gadfly, originally published last year and now out in paperback.…

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Learning and Networking at Books Alive

The first annual Books Alive! 2013 conference was a terrific all-day event for authors (published and aspiring) and book lovers. It was sponsored by the Washington Independent Review of Books and held June 8 in suburban Maryland at the Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center. It featured panelists and speakers on writing, publishing (including self-publishing), marketing, publicity, promotion, platforms, income and related topics. Attendees also had the option of pitching book ideas in brief individual meetings with a variety of literary agents.

booksalive logo

The luncheon speaker, Maria Arana, detailed her fascinating career working in publishing, editing, reporting and writing books, including her memoir American Chica and the new biography Bolívar.…

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Jay Maharjan Q&A on Drucker, Entrepreneurship & the Conceptual Age

My post today is a Q&A with Jay Maharjan, author of the new book Winning Lessons for Entrepreneurs in the Conceptual Economy. He started the @4entrepreneur initiative in 2007, and is also the co-founder of Venture Loft. He is the Nevada statewide leader for the Startup America partnership.

book_cover_Maharjan

Can you briefly explain what the conceptual age involves, and what the role of entrepreneurship is within that?

The knowledge economy brought about tremendous industrial discipline in the way enterprises were formed, scaled and sustained. We are seeing a fundamental shift in the way the knowledge economy is transforming into a more collaborative economy led by creative entrepreneurs.…

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Spiritual Writing Revisited

Writing my blog post last week gave me the impetus to update my post on spiritual writing from March 2012. As we go into the summer season, we need the messages of spiritual writers, both contemporary and classic. As I mentioned in that post last year, the best spiritual writers help us to uncover and understand the deeper meanings of life. I have relied on a number of sources to help point me toward some of the most valuable writers in this genre, and it is rewarding to find that some of them have been updated.

Watkins’ Mind Body Spirit magazine has published its 2013 list of the “100 Most Spiritually Influential Living People.” The top five: 1.…

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Thoughts on Peter Drucker, and Kierkegaard at 200

Last week, I wrote for the second time on 50 Philosophy Classics, the new book by Tom Butler-Bowdon. One of Tom’s featured books is 1843’s Fear and Trembling, by the Danish philosopher-theologian Søren Kierkegaard. The 200th anniversary of Kierkegaard’s birth was celebrated on May 5th, and there will be activities throughout the year in his native Copenhagen and elsewhere.

Much of my interest in Kierkegaard stems from Peter Drucker’s deeply personal 1949 Sewanee Review essay, “The Unfashionable Kierkegaard,” which was anthologized in his 1993 book The Ecological Vision. In the essay, Drucker describes Fear and Trembling as “my favorite among Kierkegaard’s books.” As I wrote in 2011, Joseph A.

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Thoughts on Tom Butler-Bowdon’s 50 Philosophy Classics-Part Two

In my previous post, I wrote about the release of the new book 50 Philosophy Classics, by Tom Butler-Bowdon. The publisher, Nicholas Brealey, has re-released all titles in Tom’s 50 Classics series as “The Literature of Possibility.” Taken together, they represent a highly valuable library of inspirational thought throughout the ages, aimed not at the specialist but for curious readers who are hungry for deep knowledge with applicability for daily life.

I mentioned that books by contemporary thinkers such as Daniel Kahneman and Nassim Nicholas Taleb shared space in the new book with the more familiar historical names (Aristotle, Plato, Confucius and so on).

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