Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

My 2016 Pittsburgh AIIP Roger Summit Award Days

On April 8th, I had the honor of receiving the Roger Summit Award, from the Association of Independent Information Professionals/AIIP, at its 30th Annual Conference, in Pittsburgh. Roger is a pioneer of the online information world, as founder of Dialog, the world’s first online search service. (It is now a platform within the global information company ProQuest, and called ProQuest Dialog.) As part of the award, I delivered the Roger Summit Lecture that morning, “Creating a Compelling Future: Business and Beyond.”

solution thinking photo graphic

Roger, who has long been based in Silicon Valley, participated in this year’s conference, including introducing me for the lecture and then in a nice surprise, announcing after I finished that for the first time, the award winner would also receive a one year’s membership in AIIP.

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part Six

A number of books and articles that I collected over a period of years became important background material for the Peter Drucker-related visit I made to Japan, as I wrote in the previous of (now six) posts about my week in Tokyo.
As helpful as all of that reading material was, I also read a lot of Drucker’s work about Japan, in books and articles, before and especially during my time there. One was Drucker on Asia: A Dialogue Between Peter Drucker and Isao Nakauchi, which I read in the English translation published in 1997. But within that book it notes that the original was published in Japanese in 1995, titled Chosen no toki, as two volumes, by Diamond, Inc., Drucker’s publisher in Japan (and I’m happy to say, mine as well).…

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My Chicago SLA Days, Part Three

In my previous posts about the 2012 SLA/Special Libraries Association annual conference, I wrote about serendipity and networking, as well as my impromptu conversations with top executives from companies exhibiting at the INFO-EXPO. I also noted that my time in Chicago was somewhat limited, but I feel that I made the most of it. I really enjoyed Guy Kawasaki’s keynote, and finally had the opportunity to meet him briefly in person afterwards. Coincidentally, in my capacity as managing editor of Leader to Leader, I recently edited an article he wrote, Ten Steps to Enchanting Your Employees, for our Summer 2012 issue.…

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My Chicago SLA Days, Part One

This year’s SLA/Special Libraries Association annual conference in Chicago  is now complete. Although attendance appeared to be down from last year, it was still a great experience: a nonstop opportunity for networking and learning. It was also a special occasion for me, as I was honored to receive the Rose L. Vormelker Award “…for exceptional service to the information profession through the education and mentoring of students and working professionals.”
The conference took place in the middle of the semester for the course I teach as an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of America School of Library and Information Science, The Special Library/Information Center.…

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part Five

In my previous post about my recent Peter Drucker-related visit to Tokyo, I wrote about the generous people in Japan and the United States who helped me prepare for my first visit to Japan. I also did a lot of reading about the country in the months leading up to the visit, on the 14 hour airplane flight, and while I was in Tokyo.
Besides the Fodor’s guidebooks/website and tips-about-Tokyo web searching, I finally was able to make use of articles I’d been saving for years about Japan from The Economist and the Financial Times. It was a fitting touch that my hotel had free copies of the Financial Times Asia edition in the lobby.…

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part Three

In the previous entry in a series of posts about my recent Peter Drucker-related visit to Japan,  I wrote about Atsuo Ueda, Drucker’s longtime editor/translator in that country, who supervised the translation of my book. Even though I can’t read the language, I couldn’t resist buying a copy of Mr. Ueda’s new book, Peter F. Drucker Completed Book Guide. It is published by Diamond, Drucker’s longtime publisher, which also published my book.

Among other features, the guide appears to be a summary of each of Drucker’s books, with a beautiful design and the names of each book also in English.…

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part Two

Earlier this week I wrote the first in a series of posts about my recent visit to Japan in support of the Japanese edition of my Peter Drucker-related book. As I mentioned, I worked closely with Chikao (Chuck) Ueno, Tomomasa Yagisawa and Joseph Lee, among others. All three were generous and kind to me and my wife, Deborah, during our week in Tokyo. We had personalized introductions to the city that would be hard to get otherwise.
And I was happy to meet the translator of my book, Yasushi Isaka. Chuck introduced him to the American edition when it was published in 2009.…

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part One

Last week I had the honor of visiting Tokyo, to make four presentations related to Peter Drucker, who remains a major influence in Japan. It was my first visit to the country, and a profound experience. This is the first of a series of posts I’ll write about different aspects of my days there.
Everything revolved around my presentation for the Drucker Workshop 7th Annual Conference, at Waseda University, on May 26th. My appearance there was arranged by Chikao (Chuck) Ueno, whom I first met when researching my book at the Drucker-Ito School in Claremont, Cal., in 2007. (The name of the school further shows Drucker’s ties to Japan, with its benefactor Masatoshi Ito, a Japanese business leader.) A Japanese translation of my book was published last year by Diamond, Drucker’s longtime publisher in that country.…

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Peter Drucker’s 1964 Commencement Address: The Knowledge Revolution

Many notable people will be delivering commencement addresses on campuses across the country this month. But it is worth looking back to May 31, 1964, when Peter Drucker delivered the commencement addresses at the University of Scranton, in Scranton, Pa.  I was born and raised there, and in 2010 I wrote about my return to the city in May of that year, to give a presentation about my book based on Drucker’s work.

The June 1, 1964 edition of The Scranton Times published a transcript of Drucker’s talk, though it is not online. (However, the Drucker Archives has an online photo of his honorary doctorate degree.) While congratulating the all-male graduates – the school began admitting women in 1972 – he reminded them of the responsibility to put their knowledge to work for the benefit of as many people as possible.

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Drucker, Dylan and The Beatles

What did Peter Drucker have in common with Bob Dylan and The Beatles? More than you might initially think. All were/are at the top of their fields; all were/are prolific, serious innovators. They also changed their initial styles of expression from their early to more mature work.
Beyond that, there are interesting geographic angles. Drucker, who was born in Vienna, Austria in 1909, began working as a clerk apprentice, and studying law at Hamburg University, in Germany, in 1927. This was a formative time for him, which included being introduced to great works of literature by a local librarian, and also attending the opera on a student ticket to hear what became a life-changing work, Verdi’s Falstaff.  Thirty- three years later, in 1960, The Beatles left Liverpool and did their own apprenticeship in Hamburg; playing grueling hours in the city’s gritty clubs.…

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