Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

Drucker: A Life in Pictures, Part 3

In my previous installment of posts about the new book Drucker: A Life in Pictures, I remarked on the tremendous variety of people who are represented in documents depicted from the Drucker Archives, including Cesar Chavez, Rick Warren and Frances Hesselbein. As the chapter “The Social-Sector Advisor” makes clear, Peter Drucker was a citizen of the highest order. Besides some of the organizations mentioned in my earlier posts, this also illustrates his involvement with CARE International (CARE Foundation International Humanitarian Award; May 24, 1995), the Salvation Army (Evangeline Booth Award, 2001) and Mutual of America (Distinguished Citizens Service Award; April 4, 1991).…

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Less is More: Matthew May and the Art of Subtraction

Matthew E. May delivers lots of timely and relevant information in The Laws of Subtraction: 6 Simple Rules for Winning in the Age of Excess Everything, his engaging new book about doing better work and living more productively and meaningfully. As the title suggests, Matt stresses the value of thoughtfully and strategically paying attention to what is not essential and can be eliminated; the creative importance of emptiness and negative space; and the power of intelligently working within constraints. This is his fourth book since 2006, on top of leading his own Los Angeles-based “ideas agency,” Edit Innovation, and lots of public speaking and blogging.…

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part Six

A number of books and articles that I collected over a period of years became important background material for the Peter Drucker-related visit I made to Japan, as I wrote in the previous of (now six) posts about my week in Tokyo.
As helpful as all of that reading material was, I also read a lot of Drucker’s work about Japan, in books and articles, before and especially during my time there. One was Drucker on Asia: A Dialogue Between Peter Drucker and Isao Nakauchi, which I read in the English translation published in 1997. But within that book it notes that the original was published in Japanese in 1995, titled Chosen no toki, as two volumes, by Diamond, Inc., Drucker’s publisher in Japan (and I’m happy to say, mine as well).…

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part Five

In my previous post about my recent Peter Drucker-related visit to Tokyo, I wrote about the generous people in Japan and the United States who helped me prepare for my first visit to Japan. I also did a lot of reading about the country in the months leading up to the visit, on the 14 hour airplane flight, and while I was in Tokyo.
Besides the Fodor’s guidebooks/website and tips-about-Tokyo web searching, I finally was able to make use of articles I’d been saving for years about Japan from The Economist and the Financial Times. It was a fitting touch that my hotel had free copies of the Financial Times Asia edition in the lobby.…

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part Four

When Peter Drucker began visiting Japan in the 1950s, I imagine he had to prepare and arrange his schedule by exchanging letters and possibly some expensive phone calls. In preparation for my recent Drucker-related (first) visit to Japan to speak at the Drucker Workshop 7th Annual Conference, I had the benefit of staying in no-cost touch ahead of time with the great people I’d be working with, whom I wrote about in my first post in this series. There were many details to be ironed out, unfolding over several months; mainly via email and Facebook. All were patient about answering my endless questions with targeted information and recommendations.…

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part Three

In the previous entry in a series of posts about my recent Peter Drucker-related visit to Japan,  I wrote about Atsuo Ueda, Drucker’s longtime editor/translator in that country, who supervised the translation of my book. Even though I can’t read the language, I couldn’t resist buying a copy of Mr. Ueda’s new book, Peter F. Drucker Completed Book Guide. It is published by Diamond, Drucker’s longtime publisher, which also published my book.

Among other features, the guide appears to be a summary of each of Drucker’s books, with a beautiful design and the names of each book also in English.…

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part Two

Earlier this week I wrote the first in a series of posts about my recent visit to Japan in support of the Japanese edition of my Peter Drucker-related book. As I mentioned, I worked closely with Chikao (Chuck) Ueno, Tomomasa Yagisawa and Joseph Lee, among others. All three were generous and kind to me and my wife, Deborah, during our week in Tokyo. We had personalized introductions to the city that would be hard to get otherwise.
And I was happy to meet the translator of my book, Yasushi Isaka. Chuck introduced him to the American edition when it was published in 2009.…

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My Tokyo Drucker Days, Part One

Last week I had the honor of visiting Tokyo, to make four presentations related to Peter Drucker, who remains a major influence in Japan. It was my first visit to the country, and a profound experience. This is the first of a series of posts I’ll write about different aspects of my days there.
Everything revolved around my presentation for the Drucker Workshop 7th Annual Conference, at Waseda University, on May 26th. My appearance there was arranged by Chikao (Chuck) Ueno, whom I first met when researching my book at the Drucker-Ito School in Claremont, Cal., in 2007. (The name of the school further shows Drucker’s ties to Japan, with its benefactor Masatoshi Ito, a Japanese business leader.) A Japanese translation of my book was published last year by Diamond, Drucker’s longtime publisher in that country.…

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