Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

7 Self-Development Strategies for the Fall 2018 Semester

Although I’m not teaching my class at Catholic University Department of Library and Information Science this semester, what follows is a modified post based on one from earlier this year, “5 Blank-Slate Beginnings for the Spring 2018 Semester.” It includes those five areas, plus two new ones, renumbered with some new material.

Photo credit: Bigstock

These strategies are also applicable beyond the campus, in the workplace and elsewhere, whether or not you are teaching or enrolled as a student:

1. Tap into your inner wisdom. My June 20th post “Sports Psychology And Workplace Performance with Michael Bar-Eli,” is based on my reflections on Bar-Eli’s recent Boost!

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33 Eclectic Books About Jorge Luis Borges

Last week, to honor the August 24, 1899 birth of the Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, I wrote about 19 Eclectic Books for 119 Years of Borges. This week I explore 33 books about him, covering many aspects of his life, thinking, and work. The inspiration for the post is the release this May, by The University of Virginia Press, of How Borges Wrote, by Daniel Balderston, a professor at the University of Pittsburgh, director of The Borges Center, which is based at the University, and editor of Variaciones Borges.

All of the books are in English (though some are translations from Spanish), with the exception of Borges y La Cábala.

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19 Eclectic Books for 119 Years of Borges

“The fact is that each writer creates his precursors. His work modifies our conception of the past, as it will modify the future.” – Jorge Luis Borges, Kafka and His Precursors, 1951, in Selected Non-Fictions, page 365; 2000, translated by Eliot Weinberger

August 24 will mark the 119th anniversary of the birth of the Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges. As with last year and in some previous years, I like to honor his life with a post that ideally captures his spirit in some way. This year I call attention to 19 books, all published long after his 1986 death; many containing new translations, added introductions by important writers, or new artwork:

The Aleph and Other Stories, Introduction by Andrew Hurley, 2004
The Book of Imaginary Beings (Classics Deluxe Edition), illustrated by Peter Sis, 2006
The Book of Sand and Shakespeare’s Memory, 2007
Borges at Eighty: Conversations, 2013
Brodie’s Report, 2005
Collected Fictions, 1999
Everything and Nothing (New Directions Pearls series), 2010
Ficciones (Everyman’s Library Contemporary Classics Series), Introduction by John Sturrock, 1993
Jorge Luis Borges: The Last Interview: and Other Conversations (The Last Interview Series), 2013
Labyrinths; With a new introduction by William Gibson, 2007
On Argentina, Introduction by Alfred MacAdam, 2010
On Writing, 2010
Professor Borges: A Course on English Literature, 2013
Selected Non-Fictions, 2000
Selected Poems, 2000
Seven Conversations with Jorge Luis Borges, 2010
Seven Nights (From lectures on Buddhism, The Kabbalah, blindness, and more; delivered in Buenos Aires in 1977), 2009
The Sonnets (Dual language edition with parallel texts), introduction by Stephen Kessler, 2010
This Craft of Verse (The Charles Eliot Norton Lectures), 2002

These books have much to offer to both dedicated Borges followers, and new fans of his incomparable work.

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5 Blank-Slate Beginnings for the Spring 2018 Semester

My teaching semester at the Catholic University Department of Library and Information Science ended last August and I’m not teaching this semester. But I’m revisiting the opportunity to tap into the blank-slate beginnings of the new Spring 2018 semester to revisit/update/revise self-management strategies for teachers and students that I wrote about in 2013 and previously.

These strategies are also applicable beyond the campus, even if you are not teaching or enrolled as a student:

Photo credit: Bigstock

1. Learn about and practice WOOP. This is a simple way to think differently about goal-setting and positive thinking, developed by NYU Psychology professors (and married couple), Gabriele Oettingen and Peter Gollwitzer.

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5 Blank-Slate Beginnings for the Fall 2017 Semester

My teaching semester at the Catholic University Department of Library and Information Science ended last month and I’m not teaching this semester. But I’m taking the opportunity to tap into the blank-slate beginnings of the new semester to revisit/update/revise self-management strategies for teachers and students that I wrote about in 2013 and previously.

These strategies are also applicable beyond the campus, even if you are not teaching or enrolled as a student:

Photo credit: Bigstock

1. Learn about and practice WOOP. This is a simple way to think differently about goal-setting and positive thinking, developed by NYU Psychology professors (and married couple), Gabriele Oettingen and Peter Gollwitzer.

Read More

6 Success Strategies of Jorge Luis Borges

Jorge Luis Borges was born 118 years ago today, on August 24, 1899. The Borges Boom shows no signs of decline: his literary influence remains strong, he is quoted and referenced in a variety of contexts, and books by and about him continue to be published. Last year marked the 30th anniversary of the Argentine author’s death. On December 7, 2016, the Library of Congress presented a fascinating conversation, now available on video, with Borges’ widow María Kodama and University of Maryland professor and longtime Borges scholar Saúl Sosnowski. (I wrote about my connection to Saúl, author of Borges y La Cábala: En búsqueda del verbo, in the 2010 post 111 Years of Jorge Luis Borges.)

In the spirit of my 2013 post 7 Self-Management Secrets of Jorge Luis Borges, consider these strategies, which I contend were crucial to Borges’ success (during his life and beyond); even if he may not have considered them to be strategies!

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7 Self-Management Secrets of Jorge Luis Borges

The title of a recent Los Angeles Times piece by Hector Tobar says it all: “The Borges boom: he may be dead, but his legacy remains strong.” August 24 was the 114th anniversary of Jorge Luis Borges’ birth in Buenos Aires; he died June 14, 1986, in Geneva. Tobar points out the heavy, multimedia presence for Borges, as well as the ongoing book releases, long after his death.

Chartres-Labyrinth

Chartres-Labyrinth

The latest were published this summer by New Directions: Professor Borges: A Course on English Literature; and Borges at 80: Conversations. They have inspired a variety of additional coverage, such as “Two New Books About ‘Borges’,” by Mark O’Connell in The New Yorker; “Jorge Luis Borges and His Library of Babble,” by Michael Hingston, in the Globe and Mail; and “Borges, Politics, and the Postcolonial,” by Gina Apostol, in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

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David Foster Wallace, Jorge Luis Borges and Self-Help: a Potent Mix

Jennifer Schuessler’s super-interesting New York Times post, David Foster Wallace, Self-Help Reader inspired several reading journeys based on the work, life and death of the author who committed suicide in 2008. I wrote briefly about Wallace in 2009, wondering about whether I had unknowingly walked by him at Pomona College, in Claremont, California, where he was a professor, when I was in town to research my book.
The self-help angle was what drew me into the NYT post. When I clicked on the link to Inside David Foster Wallace’s Private Self-Help Library, by Maria Bustillos, at The Awl, I expected perhaps a list of some of the self-help books he read.…

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111 Years of Jorge Luis Borges

Yesterday marked the 111th anniversary of the birth of the author Jorge Luis Borges, who died in 1986. Penguin has been releasing a series of collections of his poetry, prose and fiction this year, such as On Mysticism, On Writing, On Argentina and The Sonnets.  For many years his work has been reissued in new forms, such as topically or in new translations; making it almost akin to the kind of rock album anthologizing and remixing treatments given to bands like The Rolling Stones. I was intrigued to see that The Borges Center has moved to The University of Pittsburgh.

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The Imaginations of Keith Tyson and Jorge Luis Borges

Seemingly random discoveries are part of the pleasure of reading the work of Jorge Luis Borges, and of reading about him. The latest is my discovery of a feature in today’s independent.co.uk, Jonathan Romney’s On cloud nine: Turner Prize-winner Keith Tyson reveals the surprising ideas behind Turner’s mind-bending work. I had never heard of Tyson, a celebrated British artist, before this article. What drew me to it was the notion that Borges’ short story “The Library of Babel” was an influence on Tyson’s wide-ranging art. Tyson was awarded the coveted Turner Prize in 2002. Perusing his website shows him to be a visual artist of startling originality and variety, much like Borges was with the written word.  The interview reveals Tyson’s varied and colorful life history, which indeed sounds like it could be fictional; if not written by Borges at least by a particularly imaginative author.…

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