Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

7 Self-Development Strategies for the Fall 2018 Semester

Although I’m not teaching my class at Catholic University Department of Library and Information Science this semester, what follows is a modified post based on one from earlier this year, “5 Blank-Slate Beginnings for the Spring 2018 Semester.” It includes those five areas, plus two new ones, renumbered with some new material.

Photo credit: Bigstock

These strategies are also applicable beyond the campus, in the workplace and elsewhere, whether or not you are teaching or enrolled as a student:

1. Tap into your inner wisdom. My June 20th post “Sports Psychology And Workplace Performance with Michael Bar-Eli,” is based on my reflections on Bar-Eli’s recent Boost!

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More, More, More: Reflections on the SLA 2018 Baltimore Annual Conference

The 2018 SLA annual conference, held June 9-13 in Baltimore, urged everyone to “Bmore.” SLA provided many opportunities to do just that. There was a similar positive momentum to last year’s Phoenix conference, which I wrote about a year ago. While these are still challenging times for the profession, opportunities for professional advancement, education, and networking were abundant at the conference. And they remain that way, because SLA members have access to presentation slides for a number of sessions. This gives you the chance to relive what you might have experienced, and to virtually learn from sessions you missed.

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Living and Working in 30 Different Economies: A Curated Resource List

It’s become fashionable in recent years to decree that we are living in different ‘economies,’: The Gig Economy, The Sharing Economy and many others. In that spirit, what follows is my curated list of 30 different economies, with one selected resource for each. There is overlap on some of these concepts, and if there are ones that I’ve missed, please let me know. Not all of us participate in each economy, but we are all probably affected by each one at different parts of our lives.

The Access Economy

The rise of the access economy,” by Alex Danco

The Attention Economy

The Attention Economy: Understanding the New Currency of Business, by Thomas H.

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How to Be an Employee the Peter Drucker Way

On May 31, 1964, fifty-four years ago tomorrow, Peter Drucker gave the commencement address at the University of Scranton, in my home town of Scranton, Pa. I was a young boy at the time and was not aware of who Drucker was. Many years later, I wrote about the address in the 2012 blog post “Peter Drucker’s 1964 Commencement Address: The Knowledge Revolution,” and the following year in my book Create Your Future the Peter Drucker Way.

Photo credit: Bigstock

I was pleasantly surprised to discover recently that the Drucker Archives has posted an online digital copy of the June 1, 1964 Scranton Times article about Drucker’s commencement address, “410 Given Degrees at U of S: Graduates Termed ‘True Capitalists’ by Professor at NYU.” I’ve long had a photocopy of that article, which includes the text of his address, as well as of how he was introduced.

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Virtually Reliving Computers in Libraries 2018

One of the advantages of attending last month’s Computers in Libraries annual conference in Arlington, Va., is that you get to live it twice. First, in person, with all its benefits of session attendance and participation, networking, serendipitous encounters and stimulating conversations. And now online, via presentation slides for sessions I attended and others I would have liked to but could not. The organizers have also provided a complete list of speakers, with social media links.

This year’s theme was Digital Transformation: Next Gen Tools & Strategies for Community Impact. As with any conference, you can’t do everything, and there are always going to be time conflicts on various sessions.

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28 Peter Drucker Quotes to Energize Your Work Week

Every day I post quotes by Peter Drucker on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. I’ve curated these quotes over many years, and I find them to be inspirational and useful in my work and life. Here are some of my favorites, grouped by topic:

Illustration credit: Bigstock

Innovation

“Effective innovations start small. They are not grandiose. They try to do one specific thing.”

“The large organization has to learn to innovate, or it won’t survive.”

“Systematic innovation requires a willingness to look on change as an opportunity.”

“Innovation is not a technical term. It is an economic and social term.”

“The test of an innovation is whether it creates value.”

 

Self-Development

“Self-development may require learning new skills, new knowledge, and new manners.”

“The first priority for one’s own development is to strive for excellence.”
“Listening for the signal that it is time to change is an essential skill for self-development.”
“Self-development becomes self-renewal when you walk a different path, become aware of a different horizon, move toward a different destination.”
“Just as no one learns as much about a subject as the person who is forced to teach it, no one develops as much as the person who is trying to help others to develop themselves.”

Careers

“The manager of tomorrow will increasingly have more than one career.”
“We will have to learn to develop second careers for accomplished professional and managerial people when they reach their late forties or so.”
“Most of us, if we live long enough, must change careers.

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Opportunities for the Future at the 20th Special Libraries Symposium

Despite all the changes and challenges facing librarians and information professionals, there are many opportunities to make a difference within organizations and society at large. That was one of the major takeaways from the 20th Special Libraries Symposium, held on July 27th, at The Catholic University of America Department of Library and Information Science. I produce the Symposium each semester I teach as an adjunct professor at the school, for the students in my class, LSC 888, The Special Library/Information Center, and invited guests.

{All photos courtesy of SLA}

The most recent year I wrote about the symposium was in 2012.

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Special Libraries Summer Class Debriefing

Last week, my summer teaching semester ended for LSC 888, the Special Library/Information Center, at the Catholic University of America Department of Library and Information Science. It was an intensive experience: two classes a week for six weeks (other than July 4th); each for three hours and ten minutes. Although there were only four students, it was a lively and engaged group. Each student brought a varied set of work and educational experience to the class, and they developed a strong rapport with the guest lecturers who joined us throughout the semester: James King, National Institutes of Health Library; Marie Kaddell of LexisNexis; Kimberly Ferguson, Library of Congress; Amanda J.

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ALA, Libraries and the Internet Economy: Partnering for Mutual Success

One of my highlights of last month was attending “Here Comes Everybody: Boosting Economic Opportunity in the New Administration,” a policy hackathon held at the Washington, D.C. offices of Google, and co-hosted by ALA/American Library Association’s Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) and the Internet Association.

3D network evolving. Lines and dots forming a mesh. Depth of fie

The event was detailed in the recent ALA post “Partnering with Tech: Event brainstorms how libraries and the internet industry can collaborate to boost economic growth.” I was invited by my friend Alan Inouye, the ALA OITP Director, and met a number of interesting people, especially from Booz Allen Hamilton, several of whom participated in the hackathon.

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Peter Drucker and The Future That Has Already Happened

In my recent post “Peter Drucker and the Forward Focused Mindset,” I noted that Inevitability was one of the 10 Elements of the Future that I derived from Drucker’s life and work for my 2013 book Create Your Future the Peter Drucker Way: Developing and Applying a Forward Focused Mindset. Inevitability is a shortened way of expressing Drucker’s long-held concept of ‘The Future That Has Already Happened.’

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I devoted the entire second chapter of the book to this idea, which is, in simplified form, the anticipation of the effects of events/trends that have already taken place and will unfold over a period of time.

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