Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

18 Eclectic Book Lists For Summer 2018

One of my  summer highlights is to curate summer/beach reading lists from a variety of sources.

This type of reading has a long and honorable history and can even lead to great things. For instance, Lin-Manuel Miranda read Ron Chernow’s biography Alexander Hamilton on vacation, providing the inspiration for the Broadway mega-hit Hamilton, as detailed in the Playbill.com article, “Beach Read to Broadway! How Lin-Manuel Miranda Turned a History Book into Hamilton.”

Photo credit: Bigstock.com

Here are 18 lists full of suggestions for a wide range of reading tastes and moods; these books are guaranteed to keep you busy this summer and beyond:

Barron’s Summer Reading Advice from JP Morgan Private Bank, By Abby Schultz

Bloomberg The Hedge Fund Summer Reading List, By Ben Bartenstein

BOOK-ish Summer’s Must-Read Books

CNBC These are the 5 books billionaire Mark Cuban is reading this summer, by Ali Montag

CNN This is not your typical summer beach reads list, by Katia Hetter

Financial Planning Kick back, relax, get smart: A financially savvy summer reading list, Jessica Mathews

Forbes The 2018 Summer Reading List For Marketers, by Kimberly A.

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Virtually Reliving Computers in Libraries 2018

One of the advantages of attending last month’s Computers in Libraries annual conference in Arlington, Va., is that you get to live it twice. First, in person, with all its benefits of session attendance and participation, networking, serendipitous encounters and stimulating conversations. And now online, via presentation slides for sessions I attended and others I would have liked to but could not. The organizers have also provided a complete list of speakers, with social media links.

This year’s theme was Digital Transformation: Next Gen Tools & Strategies for Community Impact. As with any conference, you can’t do everything, and there are always going to be time conflicts on various sessions.

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The Intellectual Property of Karl Marx

May 5 marks the bicentenary of the birth of Karl Marx. Last year, on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of Marx’s Capital/Das Kapital, I wrote about Marx’s extensive history with the British Library and speculated about how he would fit in with today’s Gig Economy, including where he would physically work and research (home/library/Starbucks/coworking; or perhaps a combination of all).

We can extend that line of thought to how a 21st century Marx would approach his own intellectual property, and what would go into the creation of its output. In an article in the March 10/11 issue of the Financial Times, Rupert Younger and Frank Partnoy ask a compelling question: “What Would Marx Write Today?” The article describes their highly ambitious edit/rewrite of Marx and Friedrich Engels’ 1848 The Communist Manifesto, as The Activist Manifesto.

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Jennifer Kahnweiler and the Second Edition of The Introverted Leader

Our conception of  leadership has become more inclusive in recent years, and one key area of inclusion is the idea that introverts can be terrific leaders. The stereotypical image has been the larger-than-life extrovert leader, but fortunately this type of thinking is evolving.

One of the major conversation-changers was the first edition of Jennifer Kahnweiler’s The Introverted Leader, published in 2009. Now, her new second edition adds a considerable amount of fresh, updated material and it reflects the fact that we not only understand more about how and why introverts have solid leadership qualities, but also that introversion has become a hot topic inside and outside the workplace.

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World’s Coolest Position Title: Google Public Policy Fellow

You have exactly two weeks to apply to become one of the 2018 Google Public Policy Fellows. My familiarity with the program is through the Director of Public Policy at the American Library Association D.C. office, Alan Inouye, whom I wrote about in my December 6, 2016 post “ALA, Libraries and the Internet Economy: Partnering for Mutual Success,” about a “policy hackathon” held at Google’s D.C. offices.

Illustration credit: Bigstock

There is a concise overview of the Google Public Policy Fellowship program, and the 10th anniversary of ALA’s involvement in it, in the recent ALA District Dispatch post “2018 Google Policy Fellowship applications now open,” by Emily Wagner.

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5 Blank-Slate Beginnings for the Spring 2018 Semester

My teaching semester at the Catholic University Department of Library and Information Science ended last August and I’m not teaching this semester. But I’m revisiting the opportunity to tap into the blank-slate beginnings of the new Spring 2018 semester to revisit/update/revise self-management strategies for teachers and students that I wrote about in 2013 and previously.

These strategies are also applicable beyond the campus, even if you are not teaching or enrolled as a student:

Photo credit: Bigstock

1. Learn about and practice WOOP. This is a simple way to think differently about goal-setting and positive thinking, developed by NYU Psychology professors (and married couple), Gabriele Oettingen and Peter Gollwitzer.

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150 Years On: Karl Marx, Das Kapital/Capital, and the British Library

September 14 marked the 150th anniversary of the original, German-language publication of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital, later published in English-language editions (in multiple volumes) as Capital. What I find particularly interesting is that it was largely written in the reading room of the British Library (at the time located at the British Museum). Marx’s long history of using the library for reading, research and writing is detailed in the recent British Library European studies blog post by Izzy Gibbin, “150 Years of Capital.

In Germany, the land of Marx’s birth, the international broadcaster Deutsche Welle (DW) recently published “Karl Marx’s ‘Das Kapital’ still fascinates after 150 years,” a Q&A with author/journalist Bernd Ziesemer.

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5 Blank-Slate Beginnings for the Fall 2017 Semester

My teaching semester at the Catholic University Department of Library and Information Science ended last month and I’m not teaching this semester. But I’m taking the opportunity to tap into the blank-slate beginnings of the new semester to revisit/update/revise self-management strategies for teachers and students that I wrote about in 2013 and previously.

These strategies are also applicable beyond the campus, even if you are not teaching or enrolled as a student:

Photo credit: Bigstock

1. Learn about and practice WOOP. This is a simple way to think differently about goal-setting and positive thinking, developed by NYU Psychology professors (and married couple), Gabriele Oettingen and Peter Gollwitzer.

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6 Success Strategies of Jorge Luis Borges

Jorge Luis Borges was born 118 years ago today, on August 24, 1899. The Borges Boom shows no signs of decline: his literary influence remains strong, he is quoted and referenced in a variety of contexts, and books by and about him continue to be published. Last year marked the 30th anniversary of the Argentine author’s death. On December 7, 2016, the Library of Congress presented a fascinating conversation, now available on video, with Borges’ widow María Kodama and University of Maryland professor and longtime Borges scholar Saúl Sosnowski. (I wrote about my connection to Saúl, author of Borges y La Cábala: En búsqueda del verbo, in the 2010 post 111 Years of Jorge Luis Borges.)

In the spirit of my 2013 post 7 Self-Management Secrets of Jorge Luis Borges, consider these strategies, which I contend were crucial to Borges’ success (during his life and beyond); even if he may not have considered them to be strategies!

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Opportunities for the Future at the 20th Special Libraries Symposium

Despite all the changes and challenges facing librarians and information professionals, there are many opportunities to make a difference within organizations and society at large. That was one of the major takeaways from the 20th Special Libraries Symposium, held on July 27th, at The Catholic University of America Department of Library and Information Science. I produce the Symposium each semester I teach as an adjunct professor at the school, for the students in my class, LSC 888, The Special Library/Information Center, and invited guests.

{All photos courtesy of SLA}

The most recent year I wrote about the symposium was in 2012.

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