Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

19 Eclectic Books for 119 Years of Borges

“The fact is that each writer creates his precursors. His work modifies our conception of the past, as it will modify the future.” – Jorge Luis Borges, Kafka and His Precursors, 1951, in Selected Non-Fictions, page 365; 2000, translated by Eliot Weinberger

August 24 will mark the 119th anniversary of the birth of the Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges. As with last year and in some previous years, I like to honor his life with a post that ideally captures his spirit in some way. This year I call attention to 19 books, all published long after his 1986 death; many containing new translations, added introductions by important writers, or new artwork:

The Aleph and Other Stories, Introduction by Andrew Hurley, 2004
The Book of Imaginary Beings (Classics Deluxe Edition), illustrated by Peter Sis, 2006
The Book of Sand and Shakespeare’s Memory, 2007
Borges at Eighty: Conversations, 2013
Brodie’s Report, 2005
Collected Fictions, 1999
Everything and Nothing (New Directions Pearls series), 2010
Ficciones (Everyman’s Library Contemporary Classics Series), Introduction by John Sturrock, 1993
Jorge Luis Borges: The Last Interview: and Other Conversations (The Last Interview Series), 2013
Labyrinths; With a new introduction by William Gibson, 2007
On Argentina, Introduction by Alfred MacAdam, 2010
On Writing, 2010
Professor Borges: A Course on English Literature, 2013
Selected Non-Fictions, 2000
Selected Poems, 2000
Seven Conversations with Jorge Luis Borges, 2010
Seven Nights (From lectures on Buddhism, The Kabbalah, blindness, and more; delivered in Buenos Aires in 1977), 2009
The Sonnets (Dual language edition with parallel texts), introduction by Stephen Kessler, 2010
This Craft of Verse (The Charles Eliot Norton Lectures), 2002

These books have much to offer to both dedicated Borges followers, and new fans of his incomparable work.

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Remembering John E. Flaherty and Tony Bonaparte, Friends and Associates of Peter Drucker

Two lesser-known, but important people associated with Peter Drucker, John E. Flaherty and Tony Bonaparte, passed away in recent years. Flaherty died in 2016, and like Drucker, lived to be 95. Bonaparte died in 2014 at the age of 76.

Both men considered Drucker to be a mentor, but their roles in Drucker’s life, and their professional accomplishments, went well beyond that. Both had long and distinguished careers in academia, including, coincidentally, as Dean of the Lubin School of Business at Pace University in New York. Bonaparte also had a lengthy association with St. John’s University.

Flaherty and Bonaparte came into contact with Drucker in the midcentury years when he was a professor at New York University.

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Learn from the Michael Nesmith Curriculum

Everyone is looking for an edge in today’s uncertain economy. Perhaps a somewhat counterintuitive guide to thriving in this era is Michael Nesmith, who has been a part of pop culture for more than 50 years, since his mid-1960s days as a member of The Monkees. These thoughts are prompted by his book Infinite Tuesday: An Autobiographical Riff, released last year in hardback and recently in paperback.

The book (only partly about his experience in The Monkees) is a candid look at a varied life, one in which he owns up to often being his own worst enemy. His honesty about his personal and professional shortcomings and what he has attempted to learn from them is admirable and not something many authors would easily admit.

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Wilko Johnson and the Ultimate Comeback

There are few real-life stories as inspirational as the unfolding saga of the iconic British rock guitarist Wilko Johnson, who first became known in the ‘70s pub rock band Dr. Feelgood. On July 12th, he turned 71, which not that long ago did not seem like a viable possibility. In early 2013 it was announced that Wilko had terminal cancer, and supposedly had under a year to live.

To broadly recap the Wilko-related output since his initial diagnosis:

January 2013: Johnson announces that he has terminal pancreatic cancer, and that he will forego treatment.

January 2013: Announces farewell tour dates.

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29 Handy Resources on Happiness, Mindfulness, Positivity and Emotional Intelligence

We all need reminders, especially during the work week, of the positive and inspirational aspects of life. In that spirit, these 29 quick resources may be just what you need to find the right amount of energy and purpose to strengthen your day:

Photo credit: Bigstock

Happiness

Shawn Achor

Tal Ben-Shahar: Bringing Happiness to Life

Greater Good Magazine: Nine Scientists Share Their Favorite Happiness Practices

The Harvard Gazette: Good Genes are Nice, But Joy is Better

livehappy: The New Definition of Happiness

Annie McKee: The 3 Things You Need to be Happy at Work

the pursuit of happiness: Our Story

TED: TED Talks on Happiness

 

Mindfulness

Tara Brach: Resources

The Guardian: Master of mindfulness, Jon Kabat-Zinn: ‘People are losing their minds.

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Max De Pree, Peter Drucker and the Art of Leadership

I was saddened recently to learn of the August 8th death, at 92, of Max De Pree, who had an illustrious career as CEO and Chairman of the innovative furniture/design company Herman Miller.

In 1989, after he retired as CEO but while remaining as Chairman, he also started a parallel career as a best-selling leadership author; particularly with his first book, Leadership is an Art; the follow-up Leadership Jazz, and in 1997, with Leading Without Power: Finding Hope in Serving Community. These slim volumes are eloquent, full of wisdom of various types, and spiritually reflective of De Pree’s deep Christian faith.

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7 Self-Management Secrets of Jorge Luis Borges

The title of a recent Los Angeles Times piece by Hector Tobar says it all: “The Borges boom: he may be dead, but his legacy remains strong.” August 24 was the 114th anniversary of Jorge Luis Borges’ birth in Buenos Aires; he died June 14, 1986, in Geneva. Tobar points out the heavy, multimedia presence for Borges, as well as the ongoing book releases, long after his death.

Chartres-Labyrinth

Chartres-Labyrinth

The latest were published this summer by New Directions: Professor Borges: A Course on English Literature; and Borges at 80: Conversations. They have inspired a variety of additional coverage, such as “Two New Books About ‘Borges’,” by Mark O’Connell in The New Yorker; “Jorge Luis Borges and His Library of Babble,” by Michael Hingston, in the Globe and Mail; and “Borges, Politics, and the Postcolonial,” by Gina Apostol, in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

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Make Time Your Friend, Not Your Enemy

Tom Butler-Bowdon, author of the 50 Classics series, has a new book, Never Too Late to be Great: The Power of Thinking Long, that should provide considerable inspiration to many people who need it the most. Among those who should find it especially interesting and helpful are late bloomers, career changers, people in transition and even procrastinators. The premise is that significant success, even and especially in middle age and beyond, is possible if you think strategically in long enough time frames, while working hard and doing what is necessary to make it happen (e.g. additional learning, networking, and gaining experience in a field any way possible).…

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The Leonard Cohen Economy

Leave it to The Economist, and specifically the Schumpeter management column, to find the intersection between Leonard Cohen and entrepreneurship. The February 25th Enterprising Oldies explores, in a neat package, why all of us (no matter where we are chronologically in adulthood) may have to explore entrepreneurship and other forms of self-employment at some point in our working lives.
As we think about how to diversify our portfolio of work experiences, it’s worth digging deeper into how we can apply some of the life lessons of the 77 year old Cohen, a singer/songwriter/poet/novelist who was inducted into the Rock&Roll Hall of Fame in 2008.

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Gratitude and Guest Posts

Today’s post has two aims: to point towards my two recent guest posts, and to thank the people who provided me the opportunities to write them.  The more recent is An Appreciation of the Life of My Father, Paul Rosenstein (1916-2011), on Santo (Sandy) Costa’s Humanity at Work blog. My dad died at 95 on August 5th, and I think Sandy’s blog is the perfect forum for me to celebrate the life of a man whose work ethic meant that he did not retire until he was 92. Sandy has written a terrific book, also called Humanity at Work, which shows him to be a wonderful example of the Living in More Than One World principle.…

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