Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

Gordon Marino Q&A on the Intersection of Boxing & Philosophy

Only the most imaginative fiction writer could have invented the life of Gordon Marino. As you can see from the terrific profile in Minnesota’s Pioneer Press, “Meet the boxing philosopher of Northfield’s St. Olaf College,” and on his bio page, Marino exemplifies the concept of living in more than one world. His main work is as professor of philosophy and director of the Hong Kierkegaard Library at St. Olaf College. (I mentioned him and a piece he wrote for The New York Times in my May 21st post about the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Danish philosopher-theologian Søren Kierkegaard.)

Gordon Marino

Gordon Marino

But Marino is also a prolific freelance writer and author/editor, and the boxing correspondent of The Wall Street Journal.…

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Thoughts on Peter Drucker, and Kierkegaard at 200

Last week, I wrote for the second time on 50 Philosophy Classics, the new book by Tom Butler-Bowdon. One of Tom’s featured books is 1843’s Fear and Trembling, by the Danish philosopher-theologian Søren Kierkegaard. The 200th anniversary of Kierkegaard’s birth was celebrated on May 5th, and there will be activities throughout the year in his native Copenhagen and elsewhere.

Much of my interest in Kierkegaard stems from Peter Drucker’s deeply personal 1949 Sewanee Review essay, “The Unfashionable Kierkegaard,” which was anthologized in his 1993 book The Ecological Vision. In the essay, Drucker describes Fear and Trembling as “my favorite among Kierkegaard’s books.” As I wrote in 2011, Joseph A.

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Thoughts on Tom Butler-Bowdon’s 50 Philosophy Classics-Part Two

In my previous post, I wrote about the release of the new book 50 Philosophy Classics, by Tom Butler-Bowdon. The publisher, Nicholas Brealey, has re-released all titles in Tom’s 50 Classics series as “The Literature of Possibility.” Taken together, they represent a highly valuable library of inspirational thought throughout the ages, aimed not at the specialist but for curious readers who are hungry for deep knowledge with applicability for daily life.

I mentioned that books by contemporary thinkers such as Daniel Kahneman and Nassim Nicholas Taleb shared space in the new book with the more familiar historical names (Aristotle, Plato, Confucius and so on).…

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Thoughts on Tom Butler-Bowdon’s 50 Philosophy Classics-Part One

Spring is the season of renewal and rebirth, the perfect time for the publication of Tom Butler-Bowdon’s new book 50 Philosophy Classics: Thinking, Being, Acting, Seeing; and the re-release of the previous five books in his 50 Classics series (Self-Help, Success, Spiritual, Psychology and Prosperity).

I’ve written about Butler-Bowdon a number of times, both in this blog and earlier in USA TODAY, most recently when I blogged about his 2012 book, Never Too Late to Be Great. I find his writing to be endlessly inspirational, useful and practical; and I reread sections in short bursts on nearly a daily basis.…

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You’ll See It When You Believe It

Guardian.co.uk continues to produce useful, thought-provoking content in easy-to-digest formats. The latest example I’ve discovered is How to Believe. So far, this series of blogs by expert commentators is mainly centered on philosophy, with some religion. Mark Vernon, a multi-talented author, journalist, teacher, broadcaster and former priest in the Church of England is doing a series of eight blogs on Plato; two so far with the next due tomorrow. His next book, Plato’s Podcasts: The Ancients’ Guide to Modern Living, will be published in the UK in October. He does a nice job of setting Plato in context in the two blogs so far, demonstrating his importance in the middle of the linked chain of philosophers between Socrates and Aristotle.…

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