Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

Sports Psychology And Workplace Performance with Michael Bar-Eli

Whether or not you are following soccer’s World Cup this summer, a great book to dip into is Michael Bar-Eli’s Boost! How the Psychology of Sports Can Enhance your Performance in Management and Work. Multiple sides of Bar-Eli’s professional life come into play in the psychologist/professor/consultant’s first book for a general audience.

He combines both the business and organizational aspects of being Professor and Chair of the Business Administration Department of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, in Beer-Sheva, Israel; and also the Nat Holman Chair in Sports Research, at the school’s Faculty of Business and Management.

Bar-Eli is a genial guide through mastering the psychological aspects of work, based on his own research, and that of his past and present students, colleagues and other academics.

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29 Handy Resources on Happiness, Mindfulness, Positivity and Emotional Intelligence

We all need reminders, especially during the work week, of the positive and inspirational aspects of life. In that spirit, these 29 quick resources may be just what you need to find the right amount of energy and purpose to strengthen your day:

Photo credit: Bigstock

Happiness

Shawn Achor

Tal Ben-Shahar: Bringing Happiness to Life

Greater Good Magazine: Nine Scientists Share Their Favorite Happiness Practices

The Harvard Gazette: Good Genes are Nice, But Joy is Better

livehappy: The New Definition of Happiness

Annie McKee: The 3 Things You Need to be Happy at Work

the pursuit of happiness: Our Story

TED: TED Talks on Happiness

 

Mindfulness

Tara Brach: Resources

The Guardian: Master of mindfulness, Jon Kabat-Zinn: ‘People are losing their minds.

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The “Deeper Sense of Purpose” of T. George Harris, a Collaborator and Friend of Peter Drucker

T. George Harris, who died at 89 in 2013, eight years after his longtime friend and collaborator, Peter Drucker, led a colorful, creative and productive life. Harris wrote and edited about many subjects, including civil rights, politics, business, psychology, careers, self-development, health and spirituality.

Photo credit: The Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University

He was born in Kentucky, served in World War II and graduated from Yale. He became a journalist, as a reporter and later bureau chief and editor for Time and Look magazines. Harris was a media pioneer when it came to mind-body health, for instance as founding editor of American Health magazine, and particularly about how health intersected with spirituality.

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Inventing the Future with Pagan Kennedy

Most people take for granted the wonders surrounding us, including the accumulated inventions of many centuries that make our lives safer, easier, more productive and more satisfying. We rarely stop to think of who invented things that are indispensable to daily life. If you want to open your eyes to a richer appreciation of the world of invention and inventors, and the psychology and thought processes that underpin this discipline, turn to Pagan Kennedy and her 2016 book Inventology: How We Dream Up Things That Change the World.

Kennedy has written a number of books and countless freelance articles in a variety of publications.

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5 Blank-Slate Beginnings for the Fall 2017 Semester

My teaching semester at the Catholic University Department of Library and Information Science ended last month and I’m not teaching this semester. But I’m taking the opportunity to tap into the blank-slate beginnings of the new semester to revisit/update/revise self-management strategies for teachers and students that I wrote about in 2013 and previously.

These strategies are also applicable beyond the campus, even if you are not teaching or enrolled as a student:

Photo credit: Bigstock

1. Learn about and practice WOOP. This is a simple way to think differently about goal-setting and positive thinking, developed by NYU Psychology professors (and married couple), Gabriele Oettingen and Peter Gollwitzer.

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Three Questions for Douglas LaBier of the Center for Progressive Development

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the inner life, and what it takes to have a meaningful one. Douglas LaBier is one of the most knowledgeable people in the world on this topic. LaBier, whom I also wrote about in 2010, is a Washington, D.C.-based business psychologist and psychotherapist, and the founder and Director of the Center for Progressive Development. The latter is described on its website as “a nonprofit educational, consulting and research organization. Its mission: to promote psychological health in the workplace and in personal lives.”

He writes regularly for The Huffington Post, and indeed his latest piece is “Redefine Success Through Living an ‘Inside-Out’ Life.” Here is my Q&A with him on how he approaches his own super-busy schedule; plus his reading choices and views on how people experience inspiration through social media.…

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The Summer of Happiness

If we had an unlimited amount of time on this earth, it would take a big chunk of that time to read all of the books, articles, websites and blogs devoted to the subject of happiness. But that doesn’t stop the flow, or end the curiosity of those of us who are intensely interested in the subject. The cover of the July 8/15 Summer Double Issue of TIME magazine is “The Pursuit of Happiness.” It is a five part, 15 page section; including the lead article by Jeffrey Kluger, “The Happiness of Pursuit.” (This is also the title of a quirky, engaging book by Cornell University psychology professor Shimon Edelman.)

Summer happiness photo

The special section also includes a happiness poll and a look at happiness around the world (including the transformation of Finland from the suicide capital of the world into a much happier country).…

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Jonah Berger: Contagious (In a Good Way)

It’s not surprising that the new book Contagious: Why Things Catch On, by Jonah Berger, is itself catching on and getting lots of attention. Berger, who is in his early 30s, is the James G. Campbell Assistant Professor of Marketing at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He studies and teaches about how and why products and ideas go viral and get other forms of attention, both online and offline. These days it’s not only companies and other organizations that have to continually get the word out in effective ways about their offerings. Individuals have to do it too, and the marketplace is crowded, confusing and noisy.…

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Oliver Burkeman and the Mid-January Effect

Improving your life at any time of year can seem overwhelming. That is especially true for mid-late January, with many people trying to implement new year’s resolutions or similar goals and strategies. Last year I wrote about keeping on track at a time when the weather is bleak and things don’t seem to be changing fast enough. I believe that my thoughts from last year are still valid, but you might want to add the ideas of Guardian columnist Oliver Burkeman to the mix. I wrote about him in 2009 and 2011, and he has a new book, The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can’t Stand Positive Thinking.…

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Keeping The Flame Burning at Claremont Graduate University

It’s been three weeks since I’ve been in Claremont, California; where I spent several days at the Drucker School and elsewhere at Claremont Graduate University and The Claremont Colleges. Now the new, Fall 2012 issue of The Flame, CGU’s excellent quarterly magazine, is available in print and online. I’ve been reading this regularly since my first visit to Claremont in 2002, when I began researching my book Living in More Than One World: How Peter Drucker’s Wisdom Can Inspire and Transform Your Life.
The article  “A Hunger for Change” profiles Badiul Alam Majumdar, Vice President and Country Director, The Hunger Project-Bangladesh.…

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