Living in More Than One World,

The Blog of Bruce Rosenstein

Virtually Reliving Computers in Libraries 2018

One of the advantages of attending last month’s Computers in Libraries annual conference in Arlington, Va., is that you get to live it twice. First, in person, with all its benefits of session attendance and participation, networking, serendipitous encounters and stimulating conversations. And now online, via presentation slides for sessions I attended and others I would have liked to but could not. The organizers have also provided a complete list of speakers, with social media links.

This year’s theme was Digital Transformation: Next Gen Tools & Strategies for Community Impact. As with any conference, you can’t do everything, and there are always going to be time conflicts on various sessions.

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The Intellectual Property of Karl Marx

May 5 marks the bicentenary of the birth of Karl Marx. Last year, on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of Marx’s Capital/Das Kapital, I wrote about Marx’s extensive history with the British Library and speculated about how he would fit in with today’s Gig Economy, including where he would physically work and research (home/library/Starbucks/coworking; or perhaps a combination of all).

We can extend that line of thought to how a 21st century Marx would approach his own intellectual property, and what would go into the creation of its output. In an article in the March 10/11 issue of the Financial Times, Rupert Younger and Frank Partnoy ask a compelling question: “What Would Marx Write Today?” The article describes their highly ambitious edit/rewrite of Marx and Friedrich Engels’ 1848 The Communist Manifesto, as The Activist Manifesto.

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Tom Butler-Bowdon’s Latest Book: 50 Business Classics

One of the featured titles in 50 Business Classics, the newly-released, latest title in the 50 Classics series by Tom Butler-Bowdon, is The Personal MBA: Master the Art of Business, by Josh Kaufman. Alternately, by carefully reading and absorbing the contents of 50 Business Classics (and perhaps some of the other books in the series, such as the recently-released 50 Economics Classics), you could build a different foundation for your own personal MBA.

Butler-Bowdon, whom I have written about often, was born to write these concise books, which succinctly distill the right amount of wisdom from key works in various disciplines.

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Jennifer Kahnweiler and the Second Edition of The Introverted Leader

Our conception of  leadership has become more inclusive in recent years, and one key area of inclusion is the idea that introverts can be terrific leaders. The stereotypical image has been the larger-than-life extrovert leader, but fortunately this type of thinking is evolving.

One of the major conversation-changers was the first edition of Jennifer Kahnweiler’s The Introverted Leader, published in 2009. Now, her new second edition adds a considerable amount of fresh, updated material and it reflects the fact that we not only understand more about how and why introverts have solid leadership qualities, but also that introversion has become a hot topic inside and outside the workplace.

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World’s Coolest Position Title: Google Public Policy Fellow

You have exactly two weeks to apply to become one of the 2018 Google Public Policy Fellows. My familiarity with the program is through the Director of Public Policy at the American Library Association D.C. office, Alan Inouye, whom I wrote about in my December 6, 2016 post “ALA, Libraries and the Internet Economy: Partnering for Mutual Success,” about a “policy hackathon” held at Google’s D.C. offices.

Illustration credit: Bigstock

There is a concise overview of the Google Public Policy Fellowship program, and the 10th anniversary of ALA’s involvement in it, in the recent ALA District Dispatch post “2018 Google Policy Fellowship applications now open,” by Emily Wagner.

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28 Peter Drucker Quotes to Energize Your Work Week

Every day I post quotes by Peter Drucker on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. I’ve curated these quotes over many years, and I find them to be inspirational and useful in my work and life. Here are some of my favorites, grouped by topic:

Illustration credit: Bigstock

Innovation

“Effective innovations start small. They are not grandiose. They try to do one specific thing.”

“The large organization has to learn to innovate, or it won’t survive.”

“Systematic innovation requires a willingness to look on change as an opportunity.”

“Innovation is not a technical term. It is an economic and social term.”

“The test of an innovation is whether it creates value.”

 

Self-Development

“Self-development may require learning new skills, new knowledge, and new manners.”

“The first priority for one’s own development is to strive for excellence.”
“Listening for the signal that it is time to change is an essential skill for self-development.”
“Self-development becomes self-renewal when you walk a different path, become aware of a different horizon, move toward a different destination.”
“Just as no one learns as much about a subject as the person who is forced to teach it, no one develops as much as the person who is trying to help others to develop themselves.”

Careers

“The manager of tomorrow will increasingly have more than one career.”
“We will have to learn to develop second careers for accomplished professional and managerial people when they reach their late forties or so.”
“Most of us, if we live long enough, must change careers.

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The “Deeper Sense of Purpose” of T. George Harris, a Collaborator and Friend of Peter Drucker

T. George Harris, who died at 89 in 2013, eight years after his longtime friend and collaborator, Peter Drucker, led a colorful, creative and productive life. Harris wrote and edited about many subjects, including civil rights, politics, business, psychology, careers, self-development, health and spirituality.

Photo credit: The Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University

He was born in Kentucky, served in World War II and graduated from Yale. He became a journalist, as a reporter and later bureau chief and editor for Time and Look magazines. Harris was a media pioneer when it came to mind-body health, for instance as founding editor of American Health magazine, and particularly about how health intersected with spirituality.

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7 Lessons from Drucker Day 2017

I recently returned from this year’s Drucker Day (November 4) at the Drucker School of Management in Claremont, California, part of the Claremont Graduate University. The event attracted more than 400 alumni, students, faculty, staff, and friends of the school. The theme was “The Peter Drucker Path: Past, Present and Future.”

Photos Courtesy of Claremont Graduate University.

I’ve attended (and sometimes participated in) a number of these events, and have written about them, most recently at Drucker Day 2015. The morning keynote this year was by Renée Mauborgne, a professor at the business school INSEAD, and co-author (with W.

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MacArthur, Nobel, and Drucker: Inspiration from Awards Season

I have been reading for years the acceptance speeches of Nobel prize winners.” – Peter Drucker, 1969.

Photo credit: Bigstock

There is little wonder why Peter Drucker found inspiration in reading about winners of prestigious prizes. When he wrote the above, nearly 50 years ago in his book The Age of Discontinuity, it took some effort to find this information. Now, much of it is readily available on the Nobel Prizes’ website. We are at this time of year awash in inspiration, especially from the ongoing announcements of winners for the various Nobel Prizes. In addition, there is the MacArthur Fellows program (AKA ‘Genius Grants,’) which I wrote about in Create Your Future the Peter Drucker Way and in my October 8, 2012 post “Become Your Own Genius Grant Fellow.” In September, the Drucker Institute announced that We Care Solar, of Berkeley, Ca., was the winner of the 2017 Drucker Prize.

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Max De Pree, Peter Drucker and the Art of Leadership

I was saddened recently to learn of the August 8th death, at 92, of Max De Pree, who had an illustrious career as CEO and Chairman of the innovative furniture/design company Herman Miller.

In 1989, after he retired as CEO but while remaining as Chairman, he also started a parallel career as a best-selling leadership author; particularly with his first book, Leadership is an Art; the follow-up Leadership Jazz, and in 1997, with Leading Without Power: Finding Hope in Serving Community. These slim volumes are eloquent, full of wisdom of various types, and spiritually reflective of De Pree’s deep Christian faith.

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